02. Februar 2020

We live on a land with heart-breaking stories; our story of European colonization still has massive consequences on the Indigenous peoples of this land today ...

Sende ein Geschenk!

I grew up on Aboriginal land in Perth, Western Australia. I grew up not learning too much about our Indigenous history or having much contact with Aboriginal Noongar people apart from passing them in the street.

At school we learnt a little about the stolen generation – the state project of taking indigenous children away from their families. But we barely scraped the surface of our country’s history and relations with the Indigenous people of this land. It was only until leaving school that I started to educate myself on our country’s continual brutal history. Studying Social Planning at University of Western Australia, I have learnt of our urban planning processes, which are implicit in the erasure of our darker moments. Why do some stories get told and others don’t in our physical landscape? And why does the school curriculum direct us to some parts of our history and not to others? We live on a land with heart-breaking stories; our story of European colonization from 1788 still has massive consequences on the Indigenous peoples of this land today. This land was never ceded to the British, it was taken quite brutally with drastic effects. These are hard stories to tell and to hear but erasure of the Indigenous experience through education and our physical environment is only to our detriment as a nation. It prohibits us from moving on in a more educated and compassionate direction towards a more united Australia.